Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Groovy Art! Enrique Montserrat's "The Look of Love!" - My Love #12 (July 1971)


Hey! How’s your week going? Today I have for you one of the most delightfully illustrated romance tales of the ‘70s Marvel books, "The Look of Love!" from My Love #12 (July 1971). Don’t get me wrong, the usual Buscema, Heck, Colan, etc. stories are great, but this one is outta sight! Definitely along the lines of Steranko’s “My Heart Broke in Hollywood” on the uniqueness front.


I came across this story when I was browsing some original art and saw the original cover page (above). Previously, I wasn't quite sure who was responsible for the cover, but as it turns out it is from the hands of none other than John Romita, Sr. Notice the bottom of the page is signed by him and reads, “Done in the French romance style.” Though the art on the story itself is very similar to the cover, the interior is actually by a Catalan artist named Enrique Montserrat (whose surname appears to be misspelled on the splash page). I own a copy of the book, but since mine is a CGC copy, Nick Caputo was kind enough to help me out with scans so that I could share the story with you!

Let's begin! Derek is a fashion designer, and a good one at that. Jill is one lucky lady -- she is showered not only by Derek’s affection, but by his fashionable separates!


Their relationship is great in so many ways. Derek even wants to marry Jill. There is just one problem -- Jill's father disapproves of Derek and his line of work.


Jill's mother has her back, but Dad on the other hand just sees Derek as a good-for-nothing loafer who refuses to adhere to the 9 to 5.


Perhaps his own business troubles have Jill's dad in a tizzy? Well, that's what Jill's mom seems to think anyway. Meanwhile, Derek has found a job working at Saks Fifth Avenue. But to Jill's distress, he has turned it down. Before he can explain himself, Jill takes off.


Jill begins to doubt the romantic and freewheelin' nature of Derek's creative endeavors.


Just as Jill begins to sort things out, her mom comes to tell her the news that the family is not doing well financially due to the decline in advertising revenue from Jill's father's job. Jill vows to get a job to help the family. She also contemplates what life would be like without Derek in it. But just as Jill starts to sink further into her thoughts, Derek shows up in a fancy sports car.


Derek explains what he originally tried to when he broke the news to Jill that he turned down the department store job. He signed a deal to open a franchise of boutiques across the country! Not only that, but he has also given all the advertising work for the company to Jill's father. The two marry and live (most likely anyhow) happily ever after!


Wow! What a visual treat, don't you agree?! I do have to admit, despite the breathtaking art the story is a little simplistic and fantastical. But... even though the pieces seem to magically fall into place for all characters involved a little too perfectly, it is easy on this one for me to look past the plot flaws and revel in the gorgeous art! What do you think? Is the art or the story more important for you when it comes to comic books?

14 comments:

  1. Looks like Romita was inspired by Enrique !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup! Nice to see a different style from Romita!

      Delete
  2. Here is a link to some more recent work by Enrique Monserrat...

    http://www.arcadja.com/auctions/en/private/foj_enric_montserrat/artworks/135547/0/

    The young lady in the picture entitled “Muchacha” looks a lot like the girl in the comic book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really nice stuff! I only wish that Montserrat had done more romance art!

      Delete
  3. Jacque: Did Lee really write these late 60s/early 70s stories or were they just old stories redrawn?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't have any hard evidence on this, but I am sure it was a mix of the two -- some new stories and many revised old ones. I have come across quite a few DC ones that were redrawn (future post!) old stories. I haven't had a chance yet to do a comparison with the Marvel books, but it is more than likely that at least a few are recycled.

      Delete
  4. Some of those stories by Lee were likely revised romance stories, something that also occured with a few of the concurrent fantasy stories appearing in Tower of Shadows and Chamber of Darkness.

    Montserrat's style is very decorative and attractive. The coloring is very nice as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the coloring is one of the best parts of the whole piece!

      Delete
  5. Wow, talk about groovy! I love that late 60s early 70s look.

    ReplyDelete
  6. And that's a GT-40 he's driving

    I like the visuals but the whole thing lack of impacts and emotions

    ReplyDelete
  7. Very nice work. I wonder if the artist also drew for British girls' comics of the Seventies - it's very reminiscent of work seen in, say, DC Thomson's Jackie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I checked in a few of the Jackie's I have (Danish language versions) and the art is definitely in the same vein. They are unsigned as well. I don't doubt if some of his work did end up in the British comics.

      Delete

Comic Blog Elite